The Clasp

clasp \ˈklasp\

: a device for holding together objects or parts of something (such as a purse, necklace, belt, etc.)

: a strong hold with your hands or arms

Clasp is a word that we don’t use very often. It is a noun and a verb.

Think about it for a second. When was the last time you thought about the clasp on your jewelry? Probably when you were trying to attach the two ends of the chain. Or when you saw that it had made its way to the prominent area of display instead of its relegated area of the back, out of sight position. We don’t think about a clasp until it doesn’t work, or will not close easily, or it is being seen instead of the item of intended demonstration and admiration you chose to put on the necklace or bracelet.

On clothing it is banished to the backside, as hidden as possible, doing its job of holding two ends together. Without any appreciation, the clasp provides security and function to the form of the design.

There is one type of clasp that does command attention. A belt is promoted in its work with a buckle that is part of the look. And though a buckle might be considered in the clasp family, it is an exception to the overall rule of “out of sight, out of mind”, “not to be seen or heard”.

So, Clasp the noun. Generally unappreciated, unnoticed, only recognized when it is needed to go to work and not thought of again unless it doesn’t work.

Clasp as an action. Though we don’t usually say, “I want to clasp your hand”, nor would it sound right in the popular Beatles song, it can be a very comforting move from one person to another. Not a hurtful grab or mean stronghold, a clasp can be the support needed to steady or pull up someone who needs a hand.

I asked someone recently, “When was the last time you thought about a Clasp?” ‘A what?’, they replied. “A clasp”, I said. There was a pause, then they said, ‘I don’t know, what’s your point?’

And so began my desire to write this blog about clasps. What is my point, I wondered. I don’t know that I have one. It could be that I sometimes champion the causes of the underdog, down-trodden, oppressed, forgotten, hurt, unappreciated, and lost. But dwelling on a clasp? Yes, it is somewhat odd, yet maybe somewhat necessary to remind myself and a few readers that there are many unrecognized things, and people, in the backgrounds of our lives that work away providing form in our function, security, order and ease. Maybe my clasp focus will help call out our appreciation for other small things in life.

Another point might be that sometimes we need a clasp physically. A hand up from a stumble, an embrace of greeting to feel loved and welcomed. If I see you and say, “Hey friend! Give me a clasp!” You will now understand what I mean.

So, clasp but not least; try to notice the unseen or unappreciated today. Gratitude may occur when you least expect it!